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Identification:

Preferred Structure Name:
Maj. John Daves Monument
Structure Number:
HS-05
Other Structure Name(s):
 
Other Structure Name(s)
1. 
John Daves Monument (No. HS 5)
Park:
Guilford Courthouse National Military Park
Historic District:
 
Historic District
1. 
Guilford Courthouse National Military Park
Structure State:
North Carolina
Structure County:
Guilford
Region:
Southeast
Cluster:
Appalachian
Administrative Unit:
Guilford Courthouse National Military Park
LCS ID:
012185
 
Historical Significance:

National Register Status:
Entered - Documented
National Register Date:
05/22/1978
National Historic Landmark?:
Yes
National Historic Landmark Date:
01/03/2001
Significance Level:
Contributing
Short Significance Description:
The Major John Daves Monument is significant at the state level under NR criterion A. It is also listed as a non-contributing resource in the Guilford Courthouse Battlefield NHL. It commemorates the life and works of Daves, an American Revolutionary War officer, and marks the location of his grave.
Long Significance Description:
Guilford Courthouse National Military Park is located in the city of Greensboro, North Carolina. The site is subdivided into three contiguous areas by two heavily traveled roads, U.S.220 and New Garden Road. The land is gently rolling, wooded and crossed by two creeks. This once agrarian setting has essentially been absorbed into the expanding suburban development of the city of Greensboro. According to the National Register nomination the park’s period of significance is 1781 (Revolutionary War battle) with a later amendment to the nomination adding 1933 1942 (NPS Park Development era). A significant period of landscape development from 1887 1917, during the tenure of Guilford Battle Ground Company, has not been added to the National Register nomination as little remains from the period of development.

Like many of the monuments located at Guilford Courthouse National Military Park, the Major John Daves Monument commemorates an individual who though was an American patriot and supporter of the Revolution, had no direct connection to the Battle of Guilford Courthouse. When conservation efforts began at Guilford Courthouse battlefield, the original plan implemented by Judge Schenck and the Guilford Battle Ground Company was to create a “ ‘pleasuring grounds’ where American could reflect upon the momentous events of the nation’s past within a park-like setting” (NHL, Pg. 9). To create this “park-like setting” the Company erected several monuments and allowed other individuals and organizations to erect their own memorials within the park. In 1888 this plan evolved and an idea to create “a shrine for patriots” (Guilford Battle Ground Company Website, History) began. Between 1888 and 1906 the remains of ten men were removed from their original resting place and re-interred at the park. Of the ten, four of the men were not at the Battle of Guilford Courthouse; William Hooper, John Penn, Brig. General Jethro Sumner and Major John Daves. Hooper and Penn were two of North Carolina’s signers of the Declaration of Independence, Sumner and Daves were both in the officers within the Continental Line Regiments from North Carolina.

The following is from Thomas Baker’s, "The Monuments at Guilford Courthouse National Military Park North Carolina", 1979:

A native of North Carolina, John Daves was born in Mecklenburg County in 1748. He moved to New Bern around 1770. Daves’ Revolutionary War service began in June 1776 when he was appointed quartermaster of the Second North Carolina Regiment, Continental Line. Daves served with his regiment until captured at Charleston, South Carolina, in May 1780. On his release he was promoted captain to date from the Battle of Eutaw Springs, September 8, 1781. He later received the honorary rank of brevet major.

Following the war, Daves served as collector of the port of New Bern until his death October 12, 1804. His remains and monument were moved to Guilford Courthouse in 1893.
 
Construction Period:

Construction Period:
Historic
Chronology:
 
Physical Event
Begin Year
Begin Year AD/BC
End Year
End Year AD/BC
Designer
Designer Occupation
1. 
Built
1893
AD
1893
AD


2. 
Altered
1922
AD
1932
AD


3. 
Built
1948
AD
1948
AD
Daughters .. American Revolution
Other
4. 
Preserved
2005
AD
2005
AD


 
Function and Use:

Primary Historic Function:
Monument (Marker, Plaque)
Primary Current Use:
Monument (Marker, Plaque)
Structure Contains Museum Collections?:
No
Other Functions or Uses:
 
Other Function(s) or Use(s)
Historic or Current
No records.
 
Physical Description:

Structure Type:
Grounds/Landscape
Material(s):
 
Structural Component(s)
Material(s)
1. 
Substructure
Concrete
2. 
Superstructure
Marble
Short Physical Description:
A 6'9"x3' rectangular marble monument, surrounded by a concrete frame and flush with the ground. Inscription on top. Bronze DAR plaque in front.
Long Physical Description:
Inscription:
Here are deposited the remains
of
Major John Daves;
One
of the well tried patriots of our Revolutionary
War;
who departed this life October 12th, 1804,
Aged 56 years.
Epitaph by a Friend
Beneath this monumenal stone repos'd
In shrouded gloom, the relics of the dead
Await th' archangel's renovating trump,
And the dread sentence of the Judge Supreme.
But GOD's the Judge! in truth and justice robed;
Inpartial to reward the friend sincere,
The virtues of the patriot, parent, spouse;
And these O Major! these were surely thine.
Yes, these were thine - and more still more conjoin'd
T' endear thee to thy family and friends,
To leave a lasting memory behind,
To leave a lasting memory behind,
And seal thy passport to the realms of bliss.

The monument originally was placed on 6 stone pedestals, each two and one-half feet high. On the west end, place perpendicular to the ground, was a stone marker. The marker was inscribed with the monument's erection date of June of 1893 (the erection date was actually August 22, 1893). Between 1922 and 1932 the monument was struct by a motor vehicle and the slab was broken in two. Due to structural problems the pedestals and marker were removed and the slab was placed flush to the ground and surrounded by a concrete frame. The monument was again changed when on March 2, 1948 a small bronze plaque was placed in front of the grave by members of the North Carolina Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution.