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Record: 1  330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 of 397
Identification:

Preferred Structure Name:
Miller Homestead Barn
Structure Number:
B1385
Other Structure Name(s):
 
Other Structure Name(s)
1. 
Inholding
2. 
J.K. Miller Homestead
Park:
Glacier National Park
Historic District:
 
Historic District
No records.
Structure State:
Montana
Structure County:
Flathead
Region:
Intermountain
Cluster:
Rocky Mountain
Administrative Unit:
Glacier National Park
LCS ID:
602293
 
Historical Significance:

National Register Status:
Entered - Documented
National Register Date:
07/21/1988
National Historic Landmark?:
No
Significance Level:
State
Short Significance Description:
This homestead is a significant resource reflecting the early homestead development in the region pre-park era. National Register of Historic Places under Criteria A & C. Period of significance 1900-1924.
 
Construction Period:

Construction Period:
Historic
Chronology:
 
Physical Event
Begin Year
Begin Year AD/BC
End Year
End Year AD/BC
Designer
Designer Occupation
1. 
Built
1910
AD




 
Function and Use:

Primary Historic Function:
Barn
Primary Current Use:
Abandoned/Unmaintained
Structure Contains Museum Collections?:
No
Other Functions or Uses:
 
Other Function(s) or Use(s)
Historic or Current
No records.
 
Physical Description:

Structure Type:
Ruin
Volume:
2,000 - 20,000 cubic feet
Square Feet:
1156
Material(s):
 
Structural Component(s)
Material(s)
1. 
Framing
Log
2. 
Walls
Log
3. 
Roof
Shake
Short Physical Description:
Two-story log barn approx. 34' x 34' w/ double saddle notch corner timbering, quarter pole inserts & no evidence of chinking. Some butt ends are left with axe marks, some are sawn. Building is constructed of log & pole, except for the 2 rough sawn board doors. Roof has collapsed.
Long Physical Description:
Two-story log barn approximately 34' x 34' with double saddle notch corner timbering, quarter pole inserts and no evidence of chinking. Some butt ends are left with axe marks, some are sawn. The upper floor of the barn is constructed with log joists and pole flooring. A pole ladder climbs from the exterior wall to the hay loft. Animal pens on the lower level were also constructed with poles. The top 8-10 logs of the gable ends have fallen into the center. Split shakes approximately 2-1/2' long are attached to the purlins with no sub-sheathing. The entire building is constructed of log and pole, except for the 2 rough sawn board doors.

2007 survey indicates the roof has totally collapsed.