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Identification:

Preferred Structure Name:
East Long Peak Trail
Structure Number:
LP-05
Other Structure Name(s):
 
Other Structure Name(s)
1. 
Longs Peak Trail
2. 
Keyhole Route
3. 
Shelf Trail
Park:
Rocky Mountain National Park
Historic District:
 
Historic District
No records.
Structure State:
Colorado
Structure County:
Larimer
Region:
Intermountain
Cluster:
Rocky Mountain
Administrative Unit:
Rocky Mountain National Park
LCS ID:
663163
 
Historical Significance:

National Register Status:
Entered - Documented
National Register Date:
07/10/2007
National Historic Landmark?:
No
Significance Level:
Local
Short Significance Description:
East Longs Peak Trail is eligible for listing on the National Register, at a local level, under Criteria A, B. and C. The periods of significance are: 1850 – 1874, 1875 – 1899, 1900 – 1924, and 1925 – 1949.
Long Significance Description:
East Longs Peak Trail is eligible for listing on the National Register, at a local level, under Criterion A as it is representative of entertainment/recreation for its association with the early resort industry and tourism in the Estes Park region. Criterion B for its association with Enos Mills, a naturalist, author, and conservationist, who is called the “Father of Rocky Mountain National Park,” for his efforts in educating the public and Congress on the importance of setting aside large land areas for preservation of scenery and the wildlife. And Criterion C for the area of landscape architecture as the trail’s configuration and materials reflects the National Park Service naturalistic design of the 1920s – 1940s. The periods of significance are: 1850 – 1874, 1875 – 1899, 1900 – 1924, and 1925 – 1949.

Park superintendent declared Long’s Peak to be “the King of Rocky Mountain National Park.” The mountain stands apart from any other summit in the region – the figurative and literal centerpiece of Rocky Mountain National Park.
 
Construction Period:

Construction Period:
Historic
Chronology:
 
Physical Event
Begin Year
Begin Year AD/BC
End Year
End Year AD/BC
Designer
Designer Occupation
1. 
Built
1878
AD


Lamb, Reverend Elkanah H.
Other
2. 
Built
1910
AD
1920
AD
Mills, Enos
Other
3. 
Altered
1921
AD
1921
AD
National Park Service
Other
4. 
Altered
1925
AD
1925
AD
National Park Service
Other
5. 
Altered
1934
AD
1937
AD
National Park Service
Other
 
Function and Use:

Primary Historic Function:
Hiking Trail
Primary Current Use:
Hiking Trail
Structure Contains Museum Collections?:
No
Other Functions or Uses:
 
Other Function(s) or Use(s)
Historic or Current
No records.
 
Physical Description:

Structure Type:
Trail/Walk
Material(s):
 
Structural Component(s)
Material(s)
1. 
Superstructure
Earth
2. 
Superstructure
Granite
3. 
Superstructure
Log
Short Physical Description:
East Longs Peak Trail is located on the east side of Rocky Mountain National Park. The trail begins in Tahosa Valley and wraps counterclockwise, around Longs Peak and up to the summit, passing from Larimer County into Boulder County.
Long Physical Description:
East Longs Peak Trail is located on the east side of Rocky Mountain National Park. The trail begins in Tahosa Valley and wraps counterclockwise, around Longs Peak and up to the summit, passing from Larimer County into Boulder County. The starting point for the trail is below timberline, next to Alpine Brook. It climbs upward through increasingly rocky terrain, negotiating several precipitous landforms before it reaches the 14,259 foot high summit. The trail is 7.5 miles long, with a short, .7 mile spur to Chasm Lake. The trail width ranges from 2 to 5 feet.

The summit of Longs Peak is a field of pink boulders, roughly the size of a football field. The highest point of this relatively flat surface is marked with a cairn of rocks and a steel elevation markers placed by the USGS. A summit register is available for climbers to record their feat.