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Identification:

Preferred Structure Name:
Saddlehorn Utility Area Building & Utilities Shop
Structure Number:
B07
Other Structure Name(s):
 
Other Structure Name(s)
1. 
Warehouse and Office
2. 
HS-7H
3. 
Administration Building
Park:
Colorado National Monument
Historic District:
 
Historic District
1. 
Saddlehorn Utility Area
Structure State:
Colorado
Structure County:
Mesa
Region:
Intermountain
Cluster:
Colorado Plateau
Administrative Unit:
Colorado National Monument
LCS ID:
006519
 
Historical Significance:

National Register Status:
Entered - Documented
National Register Date:
04/21/1994
National Historic Landmark?:
No
Significance Level:
Local
Short Significance Description:
The Saddlehorn Utility Area is significant under criterion A and C for its assocation with the CCC and the WPA, as well as being an excellent example of NPS rustic design architecture and incorporating natural landscape elements into the planning and design. Period of significance is 1937 - 1944.
Long Significance Description:
The Saddlehorn Utility Area has local significance under National Register Criterion A for its association with the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) and the Works Progress Administration. The utility area buildings also have local significance under National Register Criterion C for their exemplary representation of National Park Service Rustic Architecture. The materials and architectural design of these resources reflect the philosophy of incorporating natural landscape elements into planning and design. The period of significance for the utility area buildings dates from 1937 (when the first of the four buildings was built) to 1944, the end of the historic period as defined by the National Register. Significant dates relate to the dates of construction of the buildings.

Designed in 1935 by the National Park Service’s Western Division of the Branch of Plans and design, the buildings in the utility area were constructed from 1937 to 1941 with Emergency Conservation Works funding, these were built by craftsmen hired for their skills under the New Deal Relief appropriations. Many of these craftsmen were LEMs (local experienced men), reputed to be stonemasons of Italian descent, that trained a number of the CCC enrollees. The construction was administered by the Public Works Administration and built by contract labor. Sandstone blocks, quarried in Colorado National Monument by CCC men, either from the immediate vicinity or from the Rim Rock Drive construction project, were the primary building material.

 
Construction Period:

Construction Period:
Historic
Chronology:
 
Physical Event
Begin Year
Begin Year AD/BC
End Year
End Year AD/BC
Designer
Designer Occupation
1. 
Designed
1939
AD
1939
AD
NPS Branch of Plans and Design
Architect
2. 
Designed
1939
AD
1939
AD
Saunders, Ken M.
Architect
3. 
Built
1941
AD
1941
AD
PWA
Other
4. 
Built
1941
AD
1941
AD
CCC
Other
5. 
Rehabilitated
1952
AD
1952
AD
NPS
Other
6. 
Altered
1954
AD


NPS
Other
7. 
Altered
1962
AD


NPS
Other
8. 
Altered
1975
AD


NPS
Other
9. 
Altered
1993
AD
1993
AD
NPS - Wolford, Jack
Engineer
 
Function and Use:

Primary Historic Function:
Administrative Office (HDQS)
Primary Current Use:
Maintenance Facility
Structure Contains Museum Collections?:
No
Other Functions or Uses:
 
Other Function(s) or Use(s)
Historic or Current
1. 
Maintenance Facility
Historic
2. 
GENERAL STORAGE
Historic
3. 
GENERAL STORAGE
Current
 
Physical Description:

Structure Type:
Building
Volume:
20,000 - 2,000,000 cubic feet
Square Feet:
3400
Material(s):
 
Structural Component(s)
Material(s)
1. 
Foundation
Concrete
2. 
Framing
Wood
3. 
Roof
Shingle
4. 
Walls
Sandstone/Brownstone
Short Physical Description:
Rectangular, one-story bldg., sandstone block walls, gable roof w/cedar shingles. Primary facade (SE) has one 8-light overhead garage door and one 15-light steel sash windows, four 12-light steel sash windows.
Long Physical Description:
Constructed in 1941 by CCC, this one-story, rectangular building was built on a concrete foundation of sandstone blocks set in coursed ashlar pattern with stepped lower courses. The primary (southeast) facade has one 8-light overhead garage door, one 15-light steel sash window, four 12-light steel sash windows, and two 3-light doors. The end walls each have two 15-light steel sash windows with one 6-light steel sash window at basement level. All window oenings (except for those at basement level and transomes) are framed with concrete lentils with wood veneer and sandstone sills. The building has one sandstone chimney slightly offset from the center. The gabled roof is of moderate rise and is covered with cedar shingles. The original roof consisted of red diamond pattern asbestos shingles. Wood and metal trim are painted rust brown.

The interior plan is divided as follows: the southwest half of the building is one room, the northeast half is divided dinto four spaces, used for administrative offices and storage. The shop also has a half basement on its northeast end, which contains the furnace room, lunch room, restroom, and closets. The building also has an unfinished attic.

Alterations to the Buildings and Utilities Shop include replacement of the original asphalt shingle roof covering with cedar shingles after 1976. In 1975 the original 10' wide hinged, windowless, wooden garage doors were replaced with the wider modern overhead door described above. The doorway was enlarged 18" on one side, removing enough stone wall to accommodate a 12' power-operated door. Interior alterations include the addition of a restroom (1954) and a poured concrete floor (1962) in the basement, and drop ceiling installed in the ground floor (ca. 1975). Partitions were installed to create the workspaces described above. Other than exposed rock walls in the open area of the building, the interior has been modernized and is not considered significant. Boiler moved to main floor in 1993.

While some historic fabric was lost in modifications to the roof and garage door, the exterior of the shop still retains sufficient integrity in appearance to meet National Register criteria.