List of Classified Structures
List of Classified Structures
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Identification:

Preferred Structure Name:
South Entrance Station Fire Hydrant
Structure Number:
tbd
Other Structure Name(s):
 
Other Structure Name(s)
No records.
Park:
Yosemite National Park
Historic District:
 
Historic District
1. 
South Entrance Station
Structure State:
California
Structure County:
Mariposa
Region:
Pacific West
Cluster:
Pacific Great Basin
Administrative Unit:
Yosemite National Park
LCS ID:
330174
 
Historical Significance:

National Register Status:
Determined Eligible - SHPO
National Register Date:
08/25/2004
National Historic Landmark?:
No
Significance Level:
Local
Short Significance Description:
Locally significant for criterion C; period of significance, 1934-1938.
Long Significance Description:
With the exception of the two modern checking kiosks, the buildings at the south entrance, with their low, horizontal lines and native materials, are good examples of the park service rustic style. For visitors entering Yosemite National Park from Highway 41, the south entrance continues to provide access to the park and its resources, provide services for park visitors, and housing for park service employees stationed in the Wawona District.

The rustic style of architecture represented by the buildings at the south entrance has its roots in the landscape design of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, one of the tenants of which was the creation of naturalistic buildings and structures that blended with the natural environment. Even prior to its establishment in 1916, the formers of the National Park Service discussed the important role that landscape architects would play in developing park lands. Early on, the service recognized the need to create buildings and structures that blended with, rather than overpowered the natural landscape. The creation of the Landscape Division, which, over time, evolved into the Branch of Plans and Design, facilitated this goal. The park service employed landscape architects and "landscape engineers" to select building sites, and design buildings that matched the natural surroundings. This subordination of a building to its environment was achieved by using local materials, by screening the buildings from view with native vegetation, by blending building colors with the natural surroundings, and by scaling the building size to that of the landscape.
 
Construction Period:

Construction Period:
Historic
Chronology:
 
Physical Event
Begin Year
Begin Year CE/BCE
End Year
End Year CE/BCE
Designer
Designer Occupation
1. 
Built
1934
CE
1935
CE
NPS
Architect
 
Function and Use:

Primary Historic Function:
OTHER - NO OTHER CATEGORY EXISTS
Primary Current Use:
OTHER - NO OTHER CATEGORY EXISTS
Structure Contains Museum Collections?:
No
Other Functions or Uses:
 
Other Function(s) or Use(s)
Historic or Current
No records.
 
Physical Description:

Structure Type:
Special Feature
Material(s):
 
Structural Component(s)
Material(s)
1. 
Superstructure
Iron
Short Physical Description:
This functional fire hydrant near the Ranger Duplex represents the only above-ground evidence of the south entrance station water system in direct proximity to the buildings. There was another hydrant (now removed) near the comfort station.