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Record: 1  260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 of 535
Identification:

Preferred Structure Name:
Old Big Oak Flat Road
Structure Number:
RO09850
Other Structure Name(s):
 
Other Structure Name(s)
1. 
Old Big Oak Flat Road south of Tamarack Flat
Park:
Yosemite National Park
Historic District:
 
Historic District
No records.
Structure State:
California
Structure County:
Mariposa
Region:
Pacific West
Cluster:
Pacific Great Basin
Administrative Unit:
Yosemite National Park
LCS ID:
056036
 
Historical Significance:

National Register Status:
Determined Eligible - SHPO
National Register Date:
08/23/2004
National Historic Landmark?:
No
Significance Level:
Contributing
Short Significance Description:
One of the earliest transportation routes into Valley, it was completed to Gentry Station in 1871, and to the valley in 1874. It served horse and wagon traffic and eventually opened to automobile. Closed in 1945 due to rockslide on the "zigzag" into the valley.
Long Significance Description:
One of three roads of extreme importance in promoting visitation to Yosemite Valley in the 1870’s. Second to the Coulterville Road from the north, it was completed to Gentry Station above the valley in 1871, and the desent to the valley floor completed in 1874. The Big Oak Flat Road eventually became more popular. Traffic was reduced with completion of the new Big Oak Flat Road in 1940 from Crane Flat to the valley. This by-passed the Zigzag, one-way into the valley. Traffic direction alternated with the hour: northbound traffic on even hours and southbound traffic on odd hours. It remained open until 1945 when a rockslide buried a section of the road into the valley. The section from The old Big Oak Flat Road bed and its bridges, rock culverts, retaining walls, and other man-made structures are considered significant in transportation. Large sections of the original roadbed remain.
 
Construction Period:

Construction Period:
Historic
Chronology:
 
Physical Event
Begin Year
Begin Year AD/BC
End Year
End Year AD/BC
Designer
Designer Occupation
1. 
Built
1869
AD
1874
AD
Yosemite Turnpike Road Co
Engineer
2. 
Altered
1945
AD


Act of nature

 
Function and Use:

Primary Historic Function:
Road-Related
Primary Current Use:
Hiking Trail
Structure Contains Museum Collections?:
No
Other Functions or Uses:
 
Other Function(s) or Use(s)
Historic or Current
No records.
 
Physical Description:

Structure Type:
Road
Material(s):
 
Structural Component(s)
Material(s)
1. 
Superstructure
Stone
2. 
Superstructure
Asphalt
Short Physical Description:
The National Register Nomination covers this segment of the road from Tamarack Flat campground to the valley woodlot on Northside Drive. Rockslide buried the zigzag section to the valley and closed the road in 1945. The entire road runs from west park boundary at Hodgdon to the valley.
Long Physical Description:
The entire road was begun in Stockton and ran to Big Oak Flat and on to Yosemite Valley. The old road entered the park near Hodgdon and ran to the Tuolumne Grove, to Tamarack Flat, to Gentry Station on the valley rim and down the zig-zag to the valley floor. The old road ran north and east of the present Big Oak Flat Road.

The National Register Nomination covers this segment of the road from Tamarack Flat campground to the valley woodlot on Northside Drive. The present Big Oak Flat Road from Crane Flat to the valley was completed in 1940, but the old road still remained open for one-way traffic. Rockslide buried thezigzag section of the old road to the valley and it was closed in 1945. The rockslide talus slope begins approximately 200 m below Rainbow View vista point and continues to about 1.5 km above the woodlot.

The road bed is generally about 12 feet wide and about 80% is still intact. There are numerous examples of stone retaining walls that are extant. North of the zigzag, many walls remain, but about 3/4 of the walls below the zigzag are buried or significantly damaged by rock slides.

The bridge of Cascade Creek is not historic and is a replacement to the historic brigde damaged in a flood.

It is currently used as a hiking trail, although some segments are listed as abandoned in FMSS and not shown on the distibuted park map.