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Record: 1  240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 of 596
Identification:

Preferred Structure Name:
Great Sierra Mine Structure No. 2
Structure Number:
HS-05B
Other Structure Name(s):
 
Other Structure Name(s)
No records.
Park:
Yosemite National Park
Historic District:
 
Historic District
No records.
Structure State:
California
Structure County:
Mariposa
Region:
Pacific West
Cluster:
Pacific Great Basin
Administrative Unit:
Yosemite National Park
LCS ID:
005820
 
Historical Significance:

National Register Status:
Entered - Documented
National Register Date:
05/24/1978
National Historic Landmark?:
No
Significance Level:
Local
Short Significance Description:
Mine was site of most intensive, albeit unprofitable, silver mining effort within present park boundary. 1 of several claims along ledge atop Tioga Hill. Great Sierra Consolidated Silver Mining Company established mountaintop town of Dana.
Long Significance Description:
Mining activity on the crest and eastern slope of the central Sierra Nevada is closely interwoven with events leading to the formation of Yosemite National Park. The Great Sierra Mine (Dana Village) was the site of the most intensive, albeit unprofitable, silver mining effort within the present park boundary and is of local significance in industry. The Great Sierra Mine, originally called the “High Rock” or “Mt. Dana” , was one of several claims located along a ledge atop Tioga Hill and about 800 feet south of the fabled Sheepherder Lode, reputed to be a fabulously rich silver vein. The Lode was discovered in 1860 and rediscovered in 1874 by a young sheepherder, Thomas Brusky, Jr. Brusky and others staked claims along the Sheepherder and the adjacent ledge, and the ensuing seven years produced a confusing litany of title changes, counterclaims, etc. In 1881 the Great Sierra Consolidated Silver Mining Company purchased all claims in the immediate vicinity of Tioga Hill. The company established the mountaintop community of Dana, including a post office branch, that same year, intending to work the mining operation year-round. Living conditions at 11,000 feet were difficult and the miners soon relocated at “Bennettville” near the northern base of Tioga Hill.
Originally, the company sank two shafts at the Great Sierra Mine, going down 100 feet before summit work was abandoned in favor of a tunnel through the side of the hill that would intersect both silver ledges. Driving a tunnel into extremely hard rock required special drilling machinery. It took more than two months to haul eight tons of equipment the nine mile from the foot of Bloody Canyon to the Great Sierra Mine tunnel. The tunnel was not complete when the Great Sierra Consolidated Silver Mining Company collapsed and closed down operations in 1884. The claim changed hands several times and in 1933 work was resumed with modern equipment. The tunnel was driven several hundred feet further without striking the Sheepherders Lode and the second operation ended.
The mining activity on Tioga Hill attracted hundreds of men and women to Yosemite’s high Sierra region. Conservationists, already lobbying to establish a federal reserve that would abolish grazing in Tuolumne Meadows and the indiscriminate cutting of trees in the sugar pine tracts, agitate anew over the potential destruction of spectacular scenery caused by mining.
 
Construction Period:

Construction Period:
Historic
Chronology:
 
Physical Event
Begin Year
Begin Year AD/BC
End Year
End Year AD/BC
Designer
Designer Occupation
1. 
Built
1881
AD
1884
AD


 
Function and Use:

Primary Historic Function:
Cabin/Lookout
Primary Current Use:
Ruin
Structure Contains Museum Collections?:
No
Other Functions or Uses:
 
Other Function(s) or Use(s)
Historic or Current
No records.
 
Physical Description:

Structure Type:
Ruin
Square Feet:
434
Material(s):
 
Structural Component(s)
Material(s)
1. 
Superstructure
Wood
2. 
Superstructure
Stone
Short Physical Description:
Remains of one-story cabin. Walls are 4' thick and vary in height. Constructed of small jagged slabs of metamorphic rock (shist or slate) & stacked on rubble bond with no mortar. 31'x14', located approximately 20' Southeast of Mine Shaft No. 1. Walls mostly intact.