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Identification:

Preferred Structure Name:
Tharp's Log
Structure Number:
044
Other Structure Name(s):
 
Other Structure Name(s)
No records.
Park:
Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks
Historic District:
 
Historic District
No records.
Structure State:
California
Structure County:
Tulare
Region:
Pacific West
Cluster:
Pacific Great Basin
Administrative Unit:
Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks
LCS ID:
001303
 
Historical Significance:

National Register Status:
Entered - Documented
National Register Date:
03/08/1977
National Historic Landmark?:
No
Significance Level:
Local
Short Significance Description:
Significant at the local level for criteria A and C; period of significance 1850-1874.
Long Significance Description:
Built by pioneers Tharp and Wolverton as a seasonal shelter for watching over cattle grazing. Tharp was first Anglo-American man to enter & explore the Giant Forest. Building is classic vernacular architecture.
 
Construction Period:

Construction Period:
Historic
Chronology:
 
Physical Event
Begin Year
Begin Year AD/BC
End Year
End Year AD/BC
Designer
Designer Occupation
1. 
Built
1858
AD


Hale Tharp
Other
 
Function and Use:

Primary Historic Function:
Single Family Dwelling
Primary Current Use:
Interpretation Facility
Structure Contains Museum Collections?:
No
Other Functions or Uses:
 
Other Function(s) or Use(s)
Historic or Current
No records.
 
Physical Description:

Structure Type:
Building
Volume:
1 - 2,000 cubic feet
Square Feet:
550
Material(s):
 
Structural Component(s)
Material(s)
1. 
Foundation
Earth
2. 
Walls
Wood
3. 
Framing
Wood
4. 
Roof
Shingle
Short Physical Description:
Tharp's Log is a fallen, fire-hollowed Sequoia log on the northern edge of Log Meadow in Giant Forest on to which a small cabin was attached with a shake roof, redwood slat siding and a stone chimney.
Long Physical Description:
From the NR form, "Tharp's Log is a fallen, fire hollowed Sequoia (giant Redwood) log on the northern edge of Log Meadow in the Giant Forest of Sequoia national park. This hollow log has been modified for human use as a shelter. the fallen Sequoia is apparently quite old, possibly having fallen before the end of the eighteenth century. The log is presently resting in two sections. the western or upper portion of the standing tree remains where it fell and is not hollow. The eastern portion of the log also remains in place and is the portion used as a cabin. this eastern section is hollow throughout its apprximately 70-foot length, but the hollow portion closest to the east or stump end of the log is small. The portion of the hollow log large enough for human use is approximately 55 feet in length. This chamber is very roughly round except for the dirt floor. The diameter varies from three feet near the stump end of the room to almost six feet near the western, improved end of the log. A window with a heavy shutter has been cut throughout the south side of the log near the west end. the hinges were made from horseshoes. The shutter itself consists of shakes attached to a redwood frome. The west end of the inhabited portion of the log has been enclosed with a shoke structure which includes a fireplace. The end wall includes a door of shakes placed on a frame. the roof over the west end is also shakes. These shakes were originally cut on site from a missing portion of the log, but most that are now in use probably date from the several restorations the building has experienced. The fireplace is made of local granite boulders; only the lowest portions are original. Inside the log are a rude bed, table and bench. All are built of massive redwood slabs. A partition prevents visitor entry more than several feet beyond the west end door. A modern Sequoia-wood rail (fence) surrounds the entire structure. A triangular corral built of redwood posts stands to the southwest of the log. It includes 175 feet of fencing. It appears to be of recent construction or has been extensively restored. A modern stone drinking fountain is also found near the cabin. The larger setting is one of particular beauty. Tharp's Log stands on the northern fringe of the half-mile-long Log Meadow. Surrounding both the cabin site and the meadow are numerous Suquoias of all ages. Several Sequoias up to threefeet in diameter are adjacent to the northwest end of the log."


70' long downed giant sequoia tree w/ articulated remainder of the shelter, windows, a door, and a chimney out of materials available in the immediate vicinity. Split boards shakes enclose area w/ rough granite chimney & fireplace.