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Identification:

Preferred Structure Name:
Sycamore Village Store House
Structure Number:
AM141
Other Structure Name(s):
 
Other Structure Name(s)
No records.
Park:
Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks
Historic District:
 
Historic District
1. 
Ash Mountain Historic District
Structure State:
California
Structure County:
Tulare
Region:
Pacific West
Cluster:
Pacific Great Basin
Administrative Unit:
Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks
LCS ID:
056355
 
Historical Significance:

National Register Status:
Determined Eligible - SHPO
National Register Date:
12/30/2010
National Historic Landmark?:
No
Significance Level:
Local
Short Significance Description:
The Ash Mountain Historic District was determined eligible for the National Register of Historic Places by the CA SHPO at a local level of significance for criteria A and C; period of significance 1924 -1967.
Long Significance Description:
The Ash Mountain Historic District is significant within Tulare County under Criterion A for its association with National Park Service master planning, New Deal relief programs and Mission 66. It is also significant within Tulare County under Criterion C for its assemblage of buildings exemplifying both park rustic and modern styles of architecture. The period of significance for the Ash Mountain Historic District extends from 1924 to 1967 which encompasses the period from the construction of the oldest extant building at Ash Mountain (Residence #5) to the end of Mission 66 era construction at Ash Mountain in 1967. This latter year signaled the end of development of the administrative area at Ash Mountain. Notably, this period includes the two intensive periods of development that defined the historic character of the area: the New Deal and Mission 66. The Ash Mountain Historic District contains buildings, roads, walkways, steps, retaining walls, and other features constructed between the years of 1924 to 1967, which create a cohesive assemblage portraying NPS master planning that occurred from the 1920s to the 1960s, a period that incorporated developments from the New Deal and the post-World War II Mission 66 era.
 
Construction Period:

Construction Period:
Historic
Chronology:
 
Physical Event
Begin Year
Begin Year CE/BCE
End Year
End Year CE/BCE
Designer
Designer Occupation
1. 
Built
1933
CE
1934
CE
CCC
Other
 
Function and Use:

Primary Historic Function:
Secondary Structure (Garage)
Primary Current Use:
Secondary Structure (Garage)
Structure Contains Museum Collections?:
No
Other Functions or Uses:
 
Other Function(s) or Use(s)
Historic or Current
No records.
 
Physical Description:

Structure Type:
Building
Volume:
2,000 - 20,000 cubic feet
Square Feet:
840
Material(s):
 
Structural Component(s)
Material(s)
1. 
Framing
Wood
2. 
Foundation
Concrete
3. 
Walls
Wood
4. 
Roof
Metal
Short Physical Description:
Rustic style, 20'x42', wood frame. Rests on concrete and post foundation. Walls are board and batten. Gable roof is covered with metal sheeting. Original wooden casements. Doors in gable ends.
Long Physical Description:
The Sycamore Village store house #141 was built as a component of the CCC camp at Sycamore in 1934 for $3,000. It is unclear what purpose this building originally served, but it is possible that it was a storage building as it currently is today. This building is rectangular in plan and it measures roughly 20x42 feet. This building has a post and beam foundation and original style vertical board and batten siding. It retains its original 6 light casement windows on its south and north facades. The building has exposed 2x4 raftertails and louvered wooden vent boxes underneath the gable crowns. It is painted brown with green trim. Since the period of significance, this building has undergone some alterations that are reversible. The building has corrugated metal roofing, although it was originally sheathed in cedar shingles. The building has a single door on its west façade, although a plan from 1951 shows a door on the east side as well. Despite these changes, the overall character of the building is retained in its location, single story, gable roof, rectangular form, original windows, and exterior siding.