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Record: 1  110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 of 218
Identification:

Preferred Structure Name:
Sycamore Village Store House
Structure Number:
AM140
Other Structure Name(s):
 
Other Structure Name(s)
1. 
Mess Hall
Park:
Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks
Historic District:
 
Historic District
1. 
Ash Mountain Historic District
Structure State:
California
Structure County:
Tulare
Region:
Pacific West
Cluster:
Pacific Great Basin
Administrative Unit:
Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks
LCS ID:
056353
 
Historical Significance:

National Register Status:
Determined Eligible - SHPO
National Register Date:
12/30/2010
National Historic Landmark?:
No
Significance Level:
Local
Short Significance Description:
The Ash Mountain Historic District was determined eligible for the National Register of Historic Places by the CA SHPO at a local level of significance for criteria A and C; period of significance 1924 -1967.
Long Significance Description:
The Ash Mountain Historic District is significant within Tulare County under Criterion A for its association with National Park Service master planning, New Deal relief programs and Mission 66. It is also significant within Tulare County under Criterion C for its assemblage of buildings exemplifying both park rustic and modern styles of architecture. The period of significance for the Ash Mountain Historic District extends from 1924 to 1967 which encompasses the period from the construction of the oldest extant building at Ash Mountain (Residence #5) to the end of Mission 66 era construction at Ash Mountain in 1967. This latter year signaled the end of development of the administrative area at Ash Mountain. Notably, this period includes the two intensive periods of development that defined the historic character of the area: the New Deal and Mission 66. The Ash Mountain Historic District contains buildings, roads, walkways, steps, retaining walls, and other features constructed between the years of 1924 to 1967, which create a cohesive assemblage portraying NPS master planning that occurred from the 1920s to the 1960s, a period that incorporated developments from the New Deal and the post-World War II Mission 66 era.
 
Construction Period:

Construction Period:
Historic
Chronology:
 
Physical Event
Begin Year
Begin Year AD/BC
End Year
End Year AD/BC
Designer
Designer Occupation
1. 
Built
1933
AD
1934
AD
NPS
Architect
 
Function and Use:

Primary Historic Function:
Secondary Structure (Garage)
Primary Current Use:
Secondary Structure (Garage)
Structure Contains Museum Collections?:
No
Other Functions or Uses:
 
Other Function(s) or Use(s)
Historic or Current
No records.
 
Physical Description:

Structure Type:
Building
Volume:
20,000 - 2,000,000 cubic feet
Square Feet:
1600
Material(s):
 
Structural Component(s)
Material(s)
1. 
Framing
Wood
2. 
Walls
Wood
3. 
Foundation
Concrete
4. 
Roof
Metal
Short Physical Description:
Rustic wood frame, 20'x80'. Rests on concrete & post foundation. Walls are board & batten. Gable roof is covered with metal sheeting w/ original wood shingles underneath. Windows are original wooden casements. Doors at gable ends.
Long Physical Description:
The Sycamore Village store house #140 was built as a component of the CCC camp at Sycamore in 1934 for $2,000. It is likely that this building originally served as the camp mess hall, although it was converted to a storage warehouse after the camp closed in 1935. Although this building was originally tee shaped, roughly half of the building was removed sometime during or prior to 1940 and the building currently is rectangular in plan with a gable roof. The building measures roughly 20x80 feet. This large building has its original vertical board and batten siding. It has eleven original 6-light casement windows on its south side and ten original 6-light casement windows and a door on its north side. The building has large, double doors on its east and west facades. In 1995, this building was rehabilitated with new foundation posts and concrete pier blocks and a fresh coat of paint. Woodpecker damage to the building is evidenced by the many holes in the building and the sheet metal armoring that is used in places to cover woodpecker holes. It is painted brown with green trim.

Since the period of significance, this building has undergone some alterations that are reversible. The building has corrugated metal roofing, although it was originally sheathed in cedar shingles. However, according to park maintenance personnel, the original cedar shingles of this building are intact and preserved under the current metal roof. The east entry has a large wooden ramp and loading dock while the west entry has a small wooden deck with stairs. Although the ramp, loading dock, deck and stairs are not historic, they are compatible with the building. Despite these changes, the overall character of the building is retained in its location, single story, original windows, and exterior siding.