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Record: 1  110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 of 218
Identification:

Preferred Structure Name:
Ash Mountain Residence #132
Structure Number:
AM132
Other Structure Name(s):
 
Other Structure Name(s)
No records.
Park:
Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks
Historic District:
 
Historic District
1. 
Ash Mountain Historic District
Structure State:
California
Structure County:
Tulare
Region:
Pacific West
Cluster:
Pacific Great Basin
Administrative Unit:
Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks
LCS ID:
679604
 
Historical Significance:

National Register Status:
Determined Eligible - SHPO
National Register Date:
12/30/2010
National Historic Landmark?:
No
Significance Level:
Local
Short Significance Description:
The Ash Mountain Historic District was determined eligible for the National Register of Historic Places by the CA SHPO at a local level of significance for criteria A and C; period of significance 1924 -1967.
Long Significance Description:
The Ash Mountain Historic District is significant within Tulare County under Criterion A for its association with National Park Service master planning, New Deal relief programs and Mission 66. It is also significant within Tulare County under Criterion C for its assemblage of buildings exemplifying both park rustic and modern styles of architecture. The period of significance for the Ash Mountain Historic District extends from 1924 to 1967 which encompasses the period from the construction of the oldest extant building at Ash Mountain (Residence #5) to the end of Mission 66 era construction at Ash Mountain in 1967. This latter year signaled the end of development of the administrative area at Ash Mountain. Notably, this period includes the two intensive periods of development that defined the historic character of the area: the New Deal and Mission 66. The Ash Mountain Historic District contains buildings, roads, walkways, steps, retaining walls, and other features constructed between the years of 1924 to 1967, which create a cohesive assemblage portraying NPS master planning that occurred from the 1920s to the 1960s, a period that incorporated developments from the New Deal and the post-World War II Mission 66 era.
 
Construction Period:

Construction Period:
Historic
Chronology:
 
Physical Event
Begin Year
Begin Year AD/BC
End Year
End Year AD/BC
Designer
Designer Occupation
1. 
Built
1950
AD




 
Function and Use:

Primary Historic Function:
Single Family House
Primary Current Use:
Single Family House
Structure Contains Museum Collections?:
No
Other Functions or Uses:
 
Other Function(s) or Use(s)
Historic or Current
No records.
 
Physical Description:

Structure Type:
Building
Volume:
2,000 - 20,000 cubic feet
Square Feet:
1864
Material(s):
 
Structural Component(s)
Material(s)
1. 
Walls
Wood
2. 
Foundation
Concrete
3. 
Walls
Stucco
4. 
Roof
Asphalt
5. 
Framing
Wood
Short Physical Description:
A 1-1/2-story timber-framed structure w/ a stucco exterior finish, largely rectang. in plan with a gable roof and its exterior measures approx. 25' x53'. It has a concrete foundation and a covered, recessed concrete porch on its front, north face and a concrete stoop on its east facade.
Long Physical Description:
This Ash Mountain residence was built in 1950 at a cost of $16,200. It was originally constructed as quarters for park personnel and remains in this capacity today. This building was built the same year as residence #131 and shares a similar floor plan. This building is different then building 132 in that it has a detached garage. The building is largely rectangular in plan with a gable roof and its exterior measures roughly 25x53 feet.

This building is a one and one-half story timber framed structure with a stucco exterior finish. It has a concrete foundation and a covered, recessed concrete porch on its front, north face and a concrete stoop on its east facade. The front porch has a polished concrete floor and is supported by 6x6 inch posts and beams. The exterior siding adjacent to the front porch is a stained vertical board-and-batten, which is different than the rest of the house which has a stucco exterior. The building has asphalt composite roofing and 4x6 inch outriggers at the edge of the roofline but not under the gable crown and 2x6 inch rafters throughout. The building originally had a brick chimney but it no longer retains this feature. The building has original louvered vent boxes at its gable ends. The building primarily retains its original double-hung one-over-one wooden windows, although one bay has been replaced with an aluminum sliding window. The stucco exterior of the building is painted light green with light green trim.