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Record: 1  100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 of 217
Identification:

Preferred Structure Name:
Ash Mountain Fire Control Building
Structure Number:
AM1201
Other Structure Name(s):
 
Other Structure Name(s)
1. 
Ash Mountain Fire Dormitory
Park:
Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks
Historic District:
 
Historic District
1. 
Ash Mountain Historic District
Structure State:
California
Structure County:
Tulare
Region:
Pacific West
Cluster:
Pacific Great Basin
Administrative Unit:
Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks
LCS ID:
679735
 
Historical Significance:

National Register Status:
Determined Eligible - SHPO
National Register Date:
12/30/2010
National Historic Landmark?:
No
Significance Level:
Contributing
Short Significance Description:
The Ash Mountain Historic District was determined eligible for the National Register of Historic Places by the CA SHPO at a local level of significance for criteria A and C; period of significance 1924 -1967.
Long Significance Description:
The Ash Mountain Historic District is significant within Tulare County under Criterion A for its association with National Park Service master planning, New Deal relief programs and Mission 66. It is also significant within Tulare County under Criterion C for its assemblage of buildings exemplifying both park rustic and modern styles of architecture. The period of significance for the Ash Mountain Historic District extends from 1924 to 1967 which encompasses the period from the construction of the oldest extant building at Ash Mountain (Residence #5) to the end of Mission 66 era construction at Ash Mountain in 1967. This latter year signaled the end of development of the administrative area at Ash Mountain. Notably, this period includes the two intensive periods of development that defined the historic character of the area: the New Deal and Mission 66. The Ash Mountain Historic District contains buildings, roads, walkways, steps, retaining walls, and other features constructed between the years of 1924 to 1967, which create a cohesive assemblage portraying NPS master planning that occurred from the 1920s to the 1960s, a period that incorporated developments from the New Deal and the post-World War II Mission 66 era.
 
Construction Period:

Construction Period:
Historic
Chronology:
 
Physical Event
Begin Year
Begin Year CE/BCE
End Year
End Year CE/BCE
Designer
Designer Occupation
1. 
Built
1967
CE


Herman H. Newmann

 
Function and Use:

Primary Historic Function:
Fire Station
Primary Current Use:
Administrative Office (HDQS)
Structure Contains Museum Collections?:
No
Other Functions or Uses:
 
Other Function(s) or Use(s)
Historic or Current
No records.
 
Physical Description:

Structure Type:
Building
Volume:
2,000 - 20,000 cubic feet
Square Feet:
11232
Material(s):
 
Structural Component(s)
Material(s)
1. 
Foundation
Concrete
2. 
Walls
Concrete
3. 
Roof
Metal
4. 
Walls
Brick
5. 
Roof
Asphalt
Short Physical Description:
Fire Dorm is constructed of the brown, split-face brick. The western 2/3 of the structure is 2 stories tall w/ 2 bays for fire equipment. The eastern portion is 1 story. The W portion has a low pitched gable roof; the E portion has a flat roof. Both composed of built-up gravel & tar.
Long Physical Description:
The Ash Mountain fire control building was built in 1967 at a cost of $264,766. This building is one of the final Mission 66 structures built in the Ash Mountain area and was built in the final year of the period of significance. This structure was known as “fire control” in the architectural and planning stages and is known as the “fire dorm” among park staff. Later, the upper floor of this structure (where the dormitory rooms were located) became used as office space by Resources Management and Science personnel. The exterior of the building measures roughly 50x140 feet.

This building originally provided housing for seasonal fire hands and served the local base for firefighters in the park. The building faces a northwest direction and is placed between the staff parking lot on its north and the large paved maintenance yard to the south. The fire dorm is constructed of the same brown, split-face brick that appears in the Foothills visitor center. The western two-thirds of the structure is two stories tall and has two bays for fire engines and equipment. The eastern portion of the building is a single story. The roof is built-up gravel and tar material. The western portion of the building has a low pitched gable roof while the eastern portion has a flat roof. The roof is composed of built-up gravel and tar material.

Both the north and south facades hold a narrow eave on the first and second floors. Aluminum casement windows run the length of the second floor on both facades. The north elevation has an open covered main entrance and stairwell. The south elevation has five overhead garage doors for access to fire caches and repair shops.