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Identification:

Preferred Structure Name:
Ash Mountain Residence #12
Structure Number:
AM12
Other Structure Name(s):
 
Other Structure Name(s)
1. 
Southern Sierra Research Center
2. 
Ash Mountain Research Office
3. 
Superintendent's Residence
Park:
Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks
Historic District:
 
Historic District
1. 
Ash Mountain Historic District
Structure State:
California
Structure County:
Tulare
Region:
Pacific West
Cluster:
Pacific Great Basin
Administrative Unit:
Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks
LCS ID:
056407
 
Historical Significance:

National Register Status:
Determined Eligible - SHPO
National Register Date:
12/30/2010
National Historic Landmark?:
No
Significance Level:
Local
Short Significance Description:
The Ash Mountain Historic District was determined eligible for the National Register of Historic Places by the CA SHPO at a local level of significance for criteria A and C; period of significance 1924 -1967.
Long Significance Description:
The Ash Mountain Historic District is significant within Tulare County under Criterion A for its association with National Park Service master planning, New Deal relief programs and Mission 66. It is also significant within Tulare County under Criterion C for its assemblage of buildings exemplifying both park rustic and modern styles of architecture. The period of significance for the Ash Mountain Historic District extends from 1924 to 1967 which encompasses the period from the construction of the oldest extant building at Ash Mountain (Residence #5) to the end of Mission 66 era construction at Ash Mountain in 1967. This latter year signaled the end of development of the administrative area at Ash Mountain. Notably, this period includes the two intensive periods of development that defined the historic character of the area: the New Deal and Mission 66. The Ash Mountain Historic District contains buildings, roads, walkways, steps, retaining walls, and other features constructed between the years of 1924 to 1967, which create a cohesive assemblage portraying NPS master planning that occurred from the 1920s to the 1960s, a period that incorporated developments from the New Deal and the post-World War II Mission 66 era.
 
Construction Period:

Construction Period:
Historic
Chronology:
 
Physical Event
Begin Year
Begin Year AD/BC
End Year
End Year AD/BC
Designer
Designer Occupation
1. 
Built
1928
AD


NPS
Other
2. 
Altered
1934
AD


NPS

 
Function and Use:

Primary Historic Function:
Single Family Dwelling
Primary Current Use:
Government Office
Structure Contains Museum Collections?:
No
Other Functions or Uses:
 
Other Function(s) or Use(s)
Historic or Current
No records.
 
Physical Description:

Structure Type:
Building
Volume:
20,000 - 2,000,000 cubic feet
Square Feet:
1974
Material(s):
 
Structural Component(s)
Material(s)
1. 
Roof
Shingle
2. 
Walls
Stucco
3. 
Framing
Wood
4. 
Foundation
Concrete
Short Physical Description:
1-story, L-shaped, 50'x38', frame w/ stucco exterior. Rests on concrete foundation. Gable roof is finished w/ asphalt shingles. Open entrance porch supported by wood posts. Exterior chimney on N side.
Long Physical Description:
The Ash Mountain research office was built in 1928 at a cost of $7,789. It was originally constructed as quarters for the park superintendent and became redesignated as office space sometime prior to 1986. Many superintendents have lived in this well-appointed residence over the years. This building was built in the Spanish mission-revival design vernacular with stucco walls and coved archways. To further embellish the Spanish mission-revival design vernacular, the original cedar shingle roof was replaced with a red tile roof in 1932 (this may have reflected the designers’ initial intention since the cedar roof only lasted four years and was replaced well before it would have worn out). This red tile roof, however, has since been replaced with asphalt composite shingles.

The research office is a one-story ell-shaped structure that measures roughly 38x50 feet. It has a concrete foundation with a stone veneer where the concrete is exposed. The building has an intersecting gabled roof with outriggers at the edge of the roofline and under the gable crown and exposed raftertails throughout. The roof is vented at the gable ends. The building primarily retains its original divided light casement windows, although some aluminum sliding windows have been added. The building has a stucco finish. It has an open front porch that is supported by heavy, chamfered timbers with a concrete floor that is colored and scored to resemble tiles. There is an exterior stucco chimney attached to the front northern façade.