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Identification:

Preferred Structure Name:
Ash Mountain Residence #91
Structure Number:
AM091
Other Structure Name(s):
 
Other Structure Name(s)
No records.
Park:
Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks
Historic District:
 
Historic District
1. 
Ash Mountain Historic District
Structure State:
California
Structure County:
Tulare
Region:
Pacific West
Cluster:
Pacific Great Basin
Administrative Unit:
Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks
LCS ID:
057524
 
Historical Significance:

National Register Status:
Determined Eligible - SHPO
National Register Date:
12/30/2010
National Historic Landmark?:
No
Significance Level:
Local
Short Significance Description:
The Ash Mountain Historic District was determined eligible for the National Register of Historic Places by the CA SHPO at a local level of significance for criteria A and C; period of significance 1924 -1967.
Long Significance Description:
The Ash Mountain Historic District is significant within Tulare County under Criterion A for its association with National Park Service master planning, New Deal relief programs and Mission 66. It is also significant within Tulare County under Criterion C for its assemblage of buildings exemplifying both park rustic and modern styles of architecture. The period of significance for the Ash Mountain Historic District extends from 1924 to 1967 which encompasses the period from the construction of the oldest extant building at Ash Mountain (Residence #5) to the end of Mission 66 era construction at Ash Mountain in 1967. This latter year signaled the end of development of the administrative area at Ash Mountain. Notably, this period includes the two intensive periods of development that defined the historic character of the area: the New Deal and Mission 66. The Ash Mountain Historic District contains buildings, roads, walkways, steps, retaining walls, and other features constructed between the years of 1924 to 1967, which create a cohesive assemblage portraying NPS master planning that occurred from the 1920s to the 1960s, a period that incorporated developments from the New Deal and the post-World War II Mission 66 era.
 
Construction Period:

Construction Period:
Historic
Chronology:
 
Physical Event
Begin Year
Begin Year AD/BC
End Year
End Year AD/BC
Designer
Designer Occupation
1. 
Built
1939
AD


NPS
Other
2. 
Rehabilitated
1965
AD


NPS
Other
 
Function and Use:

Primary Historic Function:
Single Family Dwelling
Primary Current Use:
Single Family Dwelling
Structure Contains Museum Collections?:
No
Other Functions or Uses:
 
Other Function(s) or Use(s)
Historic or Current
No records.
 
Physical Description:

Structure Type:
Building
Volume:
2,000 - 20,000 cubic feet
Square Feet:
995
Material(s):
 
Structural Component(s)
Material(s)
1. 
Roof
Shingle
2. 
Foundation
Concrete
3. 
Framing
Wood
4. 
Walls
Wood
Short Physical Description:
1-story, 25'x36', sided T-111. Rests on concrete posts foundation w/ stone veneer. Gable roof is finished w/ asphalt shingles.
Long Physical Description:
This Ash Mountain residence was built by the CCC in 1940 at a cost of $3,834. It was originally constructed as quarters for park personnel and remains in this capacity today. The building is rectangular in plan with a gable roof and its exterior measures roughly 25x36 feet. It was built in the same year and with the same floor plan as Ash Mountain residence #90 (razed in 2005) and #92.

This building is a one-story timber framed structure with vertical T1-11 siding and an asphalt composite roof. However, it originally had sawed shake siding and a cedar shingle roof, with the material alterations made sometime before 1986. The original roof had a double coursing of cedar shingles every fourth row, to provide enhanced protection and to add more texture to the roofline. Other modifications that have been made to the structure since the period of significance include adding exterior wooden molding around the windows and constructing a relatively large 6x10 foot lean-to addition in the rear of the building that houses a hot water heater and washer and dryer hookups. The building retains its original wooden one-over-one double-hung windows and fixed sash windows. The structure is built on a slope and has a concrete foundation that steps down as the hillside recedes. The concrete foundation is covered behind an original schist veneer. There is a small open concrete porch with stone steps on the northwest corner of the building and an enclosed porch with fixed sash windows and a small stoop on the northeast corner of the building. The building retains its original rubble stone masonry chimney, which protrudes from the gabled peak of the roofline. The building has original vertical wooden lath vents underneath the gable crowns and 4x4 inch outriggers with chamfered edges at the ends of the roofline and under the gable crowns. The T1-11 exterior of the building is painted tan with white trim.