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Record: 1  760 761 762 763 764 765 766 767 768 769 770 771 of 866
Identification:

Preferred Structure Name:
Apache St. Alley Coal Shed #777
Structure Number:
SRB0777
Other Structure Name(s):
 
Other Structure Name(s)
1. 
Apache Storage Shed 799/800
2. 
Coal Shed #777
Park:
Grand Canyon National Park
Historic District:
 
Historic District
1. 
Grand Canyon Village
Structure State:
Arizona
Structure County:
Coconino
Region:
Intermountain
Cluster:
Colorado Plateau
Administrative Unit:
Grand Canyon National Park
LCS ID:
057266
 
Historical Significance:

National Register Status:
Entered - Documented
National Register Date:
02/18/1997
National Historic Landmark?:
Yes
National Historic Landmark Date:
02/18/1997
Significance Level:
Contributing
Short Significance Description:
Outbuilding orig for coal storage for heating nearby Apache St residences. Const in utilitarian style, using materials & methods of construction typical for 1920s utility bldgs. District meets NHL Criterion 1&4 for America park movement & landscape arch. Period of sig 1897-1942.
Long Significance Description:
The buildings of the Grand Canyon Village NHL district are the largest and most diverse assemblage of park architecture in the national park system. The buildings of the historic district represent an entire range of park architecture. Together there are 247 buildings in the historic district. Along the rim of the canyon, the older resort architecture is typically more elaborate and eclectic than the official structures commissioned by the Park Service. In the civic zone of the village, the public architecture uses massive Kaibab sandstone veneers over concrete foundations and piers, as well as dark log or wood siding on upper stories to create a powerful and controlled imagery, now known as Park Service Rustic. This consistent idiom connected all the official buildings in the parks, together projecting a strong sense of official responsibility and appropriate sensibility. In the residential subdivision of the village, an architectural distinction was made between the concessionaire residences and the Park Service residences. The simpler bungalows on the Park Service side were designed with front doors accessing semi-public pedestrian paths. The larges residences on the concessionaire side presented more decorative elevations with stone foundations, fronting the street side of each lot.

The Grand Canyon Village NHL District meets National Historic Landmark Criterion 1 for its association with the American park movement and Criterion 4 as an exceptionally valuable example of American landscape architecture, specifically as the most significant example with the greatest integrity of National Park Service town planning. Similarly, Grand Canyon Village NHL District is significant under National Register Criterion A for its association with the American park movement and Criterion C as an example of American landscape architecture, specifically as a unique and outstanding example of community planning and development.

Grand Canyon Village Historic District was first listed on the National Register on 11/20/1975 (expanded 10/24/1995), significant under Criterion A for its important association with the development of Grand Canyon National Park, and under Criterion C as an example of community planning within a national park, and as a comprehensive illustration of National Park Service rustic architecture.

Daniel Hull finalized the major features of the plan for the south rim of the Grand Canyon in 1924, and today, Grand Canyon Village represents the most historically significant park village plan, with the greatest degree of integrity, ever designed by the Park Service. The town plan for Grand Canyon divided the village into discrete residential, commercial, and civic areas; a consistent architectural idiom (Park Service Rustic) was employed throughout; a hierarchy of street sections, from pedestrian paths to through roads, was developed; a central "plaza" had the villages major public buildings sited around it. The plan for Grand Canyon Village expounded the civic ideals of a certain generation of American planners and helped put National Park Service planning on the course it would follow at least until World War II.

The period of significance for the district begins in the 1890s, specifically with the construction of the Bucky O’Neill Lodge in 1897, the oldest standing structure built on the rim. The period of significance ends in 1942, when the CCC was discontinued, by which time the village was largely complete.
 
Construction Period:

Construction Period:
Historic
Chronology:
 
Physical Event
Begin Year
Begin Year AD/BC
End Year
End Year AD/BC
Designer
Designer Occupation
1. 
Built
1927
AD


A.T.& S.F. Railway Company
Other
 
Function and Use:

Primary Historic Function:
Fuel Storage Site
Primary Current Use:
GENERAL STORAGE
Structure Contains Museum Collections?:
No
Other Functions or Uses:
 
Other Function(s) or Use(s)
Historic or Current
No records.
 
Physical Description:

Structure Type:
Building
Volume:
1 - 2,000 cubic feet
Square Feet:
160
Material(s):
 
Structural Component(s)
Material(s)
1. 
Foundation
Concrete
2. 
Roof
Asphalt
3. 
Walls
Weatherboard
4. 
Framing
Wood
Short Physical Description:
1 story wood frame shed 8'x20'. Shed roof with exposed rafters, fascia boards & composition rolled roofing. Shiplap wood siding with 2 hopper doors in back, 2 wood entry doors symmetrically placed doors toward house.