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Identification:

Preferred Structure Name:
Lees Ferry Spencer Bunkhouse
Structure Number:
HS-222
Other Structure Name(s):
 
Other Structure Name(s)
1. 
USGS Laboratory
2. 
Spencer Cabin
3. 
Old Spencer Building
Park:
Glen Canyon National Recreation Area
Historic District:
 
Historic District
1. 
Lees Ferry/Lonely Dell Ranch Hist. Dist.
Structure State:
Arizona
Structure County:
Coconino
Region:
Intermountain
Cluster:
Colorado Plateau
Administrative Unit:
Glen Canyon National Recreation Area
LCS ID:
003987
 
Historical Significance:

National Register Status:
Entered - Documented
National Register Date:
11/04/1997
National Historic Landmark?:
No
Significance Level:
State
Short Significance Description:
District listed in the NRHP for its association with Mormon leader John D. Lee, regional transportation, Mormon settlement & agricultural development, survey & exploration of the Colorado River Basin, & vernacular architecture under Criteria A, B, & C. Period of significance 1872-1928.
Long Significance Description:
Charles Spencer constructed the building as part of his mining operation in 1911. It served as one of three bunkhouses for his workers. The USGS used it as a residence for various employees. Residential used of the building ended in 1946 with Dodge's resignation from the USGS. In 1947-48, USGS modified the building to use as a laboratory. It is used as an interpretive feature of Lee's Ferry historic district.
 
Construction Period:

Construction Period:
Historic
Chronology:
 
Physical Event
Begin Year
Begin Year AD/BC
End Year
End Year AD/BC
Designer
Designer Occupation
1. 
Built
1910
AD
1911
AD
Spencer, Charles H.
Other
2. 
Altered
1947
AD
1948
AD
USGS
Other
3. 
Stabilized
1969
AD


National Park Service
Other
4. 
Stabilized
1982
AD
1983
AD
National Park Service
Other
5. 
Stabilized
2001
AD
2004
AD
Hutchison, Sayre IMRO-DE
Architect
 
Function and Use:

Primary Historic Function:
Dormitory (Bunkhouse)
Primary Current Use:
Interpretation Facility
Structure Contains Museum Collections?:
No
Other Functions or Uses:
 
Other Function(s) or Use(s)
Historic or Current
1. 
Single Family Dwelling
Historic
2. 
Government Office
Historic
 
Physical Description:

Structure Type:
Building
Volume:
2,000 - 20,000 cubic feet
Square Feet:
540
Material(s):
 
Structural Component(s)
Material(s)
1. 
Foundation
Sandstone/Brownstone
2. 
Walls
Sandstone/Brownstone
3. 
Roof
Asphalt
4. 
Other
Concrete
5. 
Other
Metal
Short Physical Description:
One-story, 18' x30' rectangular building w/ a gable roof, rolled asphalt roofing, smoke jack, louvered vents, casement windows & a paneled door. Building is constructed of rough sandstone w/ mud & concrete mortars. Int. has shelves, fiberboard walls & a concrete floor.
Long Physical Description:
The structure is approximately 29’ long, 18.5’ wide and 11.5’ tall. There is a concrete bond beam on top the perimeter walls. Int. has shelves, fiberboard walls & a concrete floor.

The building is constructed of randomly coursed sandstone rubble, with the largest stones reserved for the corners. Construction appears extremely crude in contrast to the adjacent Lee's Ferry Fort. Mud and cement mortar is deeply recessed, giving the appearance of dry-laid stone. Large irregular stones set in heavy concrete mortar form the gable ends, with a the west end inset from the wall face. There is a concrete bond beam at the top of the perimeter wall which appears to be a later addition.

Roof structure is comprised of 2"x4" rafters spaced at 16" on centers supporting 1"x 8" roof sheathing. Ceiling joists are 2"x6" and support a 1"x4" king post to the center ridge beam. Ceilings were fiberboard nailed to wood ceiling joists. Green rolled asphalt sheets cover roof.

Entry door is a four-panel wood door with a mortise lockset. There are five windows which are paired single-light casements.

Interior features include a partitioned bathroom, wood shelves and both mud plaster and fiberboard wall finishes. Originally, the building had a dirt floor, but the USGS put in concrete floors.