List of Classified Structures
List of Classified Structures
Return to Results Page 
Advanced Search
Record: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 of 44
Identification:

Preferred Structure Name:
Lonely Dell Ranch Irrigation System
Structure Number:
AZ:C:2:42F9
Other Structure Name(s):
 
Other Structure Name(s)
1. 
Lonely Dell Ditches, Flumes, and Head Gates
Park:
Glen Canyon National Recreation Area
Historic District:
 
Historic District
1. 
Lees Ferry/Lonely Dell Ranch Hist. Dist.
Structure State:
Arizona
Structure County:
Coconino
Region:
Intermountain
Cluster:
Colorado Plateau
Administrative Unit:
Glen Canyon National Recreation Area
LCS ID:
001462
 
Historical Significance:

National Register Status:
Entered - Documented
National Register Date:
11/04/1997
National Historic Landmark?:
No
Significance Level:
State
Short Significance Description:
District listed in the NRHP for its association with Mormon leader John D. Lee, regional transportation, Mormon settlement & agricultural development, survey & exploration of the Colorado River Basin, & vernacular architecture under Criteria A, B, & C. Period of significance 1871-1936.
Long Significance Description:
John Lee started construction of the first earthen dam on the Paria in Jan. of 1872 and by March irrigated his first crop. By April this first dam washed out. Lee soon replaced the dam reinforced with a large base log packed with brush, rocks, and dirt. The dam was subsequently washed out and rebuilt many times over the coming years. In order to bring water to an upper field, in 1883, Warren Johnson constructed a dam on a second site higher up the Paria. By 1900, Emett began replacing them with dams built of log and sandbags. In 1905, Irving Pierce constructed a tunnel-and-flume delivery system to replace the ditches bringing water from the upper dam to the fields. By the time Leo Weaver bought the ranch in 1935, several dams had been washed out. Weaver's attempt to replace the dams also failed. Gus and Warren Griffin made improvements upon the system, including a stone lined ditch. Most of what exists today is related to the Griffin improvements In 1965, the consortium that owned the ranch created two holding ponds for irrigation water against the west wall of Paria canyon. In 1977, the NPS pumped water from the Colorado River instead of the Paria. NPS constructed a new holding tank near the south end of the site. At the same time removing remains of the flume system and valve platform for trail. This system remains in use as of 1999.
 
Construction Period:

Construction Period:
Historic
Chronology:
 
Physical Event
Begin Year
Begin Year AD/BC
End Year
End Year AD/BC
Designer
Designer Occupation
1. 
Built
1872
AD


Lee, John D.
Other
2. 
Built
1872
AD


Lee, John D.
Other
3. 
Altered
1883
AD
1885
AD
Johnson, Warren
Other
4. 
Altered
1883
AD


Brinkerhoff, David
Other
5. 
Altered
1890
AD
1900
AD
Emett, James S.
Other
6. 
Altered
1905
AD


Pierce, Irving C.
Other
7. 
Altered
1913
AD
1931
AD
Johnson Brothers
Other
8. 
Altered
1935
AD


Hungavi, Poli
Other
9. 
Altered
1935
AD


Weaver, Leo
Other
10. 
Altered
1943
AD
1947
AD
Griffin, Warren
Other
11. 
Altered
1965
AD


The Consortium
Other
12. 
Removed
1980
AD
1989
AD
NPS
Other
13. 
Stabilized
2003
AD
2004
AD
NPS
Other
 
Function and Use:

Primary Historic Function:
Irrigation Facility
Primary Current Use:
Interpretation Facility
Structure Contains Museum Collections?:
No
Other Functions or Uses:
 
Other Function(s) or Use(s)
Historic or Current
No records.
 
Physical Description:

Structure Type:
Marine/Waterway
Volume:
2,000 - 20,000 cubic feet
Square Feet:
8100
Material(s):
 
Structural Component(s)
Material(s)
1. 
Substructure
Wood
2. 
Substructure
Stone
3. 
Substructure
Metal
4. 
Superstructure
Wood
5. 
Superstructure
Metal
Short Physical Description:
Irrigation ditch running from Paria River through Lonely Dell Ranch. Consists wooden flume remnants (suspended from canyon wall by metal cables) and open stone-lined and earthen ditches, stone and wood culverts, gates, and diversion boxes. Boxes controll water flow to fields and orchard.
Long Physical Description:
Irrigation system originally began as much as two miles above the ranch in Paria Canyon, at the hightest dam site. Ditches, tunnels, and wooden flumes ran between the various dam locations and the upper field of the ranch. On the ranch itself, irrigations features include a ditch, running roughly from north to south, lined with sandstone flags; together with wooden head-gates, stone catch basins, and pipe culverts. Holding ponds are found along the west face of the canyon. Two of these are adjacent to the upper field and are now abandoned. The third is adjacent to the lower field and in use. Portions of the upper ditches, flumes, and dams having been removed or washed away. The extant irrigation system starts just to the north of the cemetery, and continues to the southern end of the south field along the western edge of the irrigated area.