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Identification:

Preferred Structure Name:
Seven Sisters Little Bridge #4
Structure Number:
BR37S
Other Structure Name(s):
 
Other Structure Name(s)
1. 
Aunt Betty Pond Road LIttle Bridge #4
Park:
Acadia National Park
Historic District:
 
Historic District
No records.
Structure State:
Maine
Structure County:
Hancock
Region:
Northeast
Cluster:
New England
Administrative Unit:
Acadia National Park
LCS ID:
041128
 
Historical Significance:

National Register Status:
Determined Eligible - SHPO
National Register Date:
07/01/1996
National Historic Landmark?:
No
Significance Level:
Contributing
Short Significance Description:
One of 12 small carriage road bridges within park nationally significant under Criteria A & B for association with John D Rockefeller Jr. & affluent summer colony that resided in Mount Desert Island region in early 20th c., & Criterion C as unique example of skillful craftsmanship and engineering.
Long Significance Description:
The "Seven Sisters Little Bridge #4" was listed as contributing on the 07/01/1996 concurence from the ME SHPO.

The Carriage Paths, bridges and gatehouses are significant because of their historical association with John D. Rockefeller, Jr., and with the affluent summer colony which resided in the Mount Desert Island region in the early 20th century. They are nationally significant because of the exceptional quality of design, craftsmanship, and construction; the high level of integrity of the system; and the importance of the carriage roads in relation to Rockefeller contributions to the National Park system.

Seven Sisters Little Bridge #4 is one of six small, steel-stringer, rustic bridges constructed by John D. Rockefeller, Jr. in 1929-1930 as part of the Aunt Betty Pond Carriage Road. The bridges are similar in design and construction to two other clusters of little bridges erected near Jordan Pond (1919) and Eagle Lake (1929-30). The road was purposefully routed to cross the stream numerous times, the bridges providing the crossings. The original wood decks were replaced were concrete slabs ca. 1948. While the name indicates seven bridges, there are only six structures. Some long-time residents say that the seventh "bridge" is a small culvert on the stream, while others believe that the name actually refers to the seven stone arch bridges on the loop carriage road encircling Sargent Mountain.

Seven Sisters Little Bridge #4 is the third northernmost of six small, skewed, rustic bridges on Aunt Betty Pond Road.
 
Construction Period:

Construction Period:
Historic
Chronology:
 
Physical Event
Begin Year
Begin Year CE/BCE
End Year
End Year CE/BCE
Designer
Designer Occupation
1. 
Built
1929
CE
1930
CE


2. 
Altered
1948
CE



Other
3. 
Rehabilitated
2004
CE


National Park Service
Other
 
Function and Use:

Primary Historic Function:
Road Bridge
Primary Current Use:
Road Bridge
Structure Contains Museum Collections?:
No
Other Functions or Uses:
 
Other Function(s) or Use(s)
Historic or Current
1. 
Trail Bridge
Current
2. 
Trail Bridge
Historic
 
Physical Description:

Structure Type:
Bridge
Material(s):
 
Structural Component(s)
Material(s)
1. 
Substructure
Granite
2. 
Superstructure
Wood
3. 
Superstructure
Concrete
4. 
Superstructure
Steel
Short Physical Description:
8"-thick concrete deck supported by six integral steel I-beam stringers, rests on mortared, uncoursed granite abutments. Wooden railings: non-structural 6" x 6" timbers, three vertical posts, top rail segments, inclined endposts.
Long Physical Description:
Seven Sisters Little Bridge #4 is approximately 10' long and has an 8"-thick concrete deck that is supported by six integral steel I-beam stringers, the ends of which rest on mortared, uncoursed granite abutments. The wooden railings are constructed of 6"x6" timbers comprised of three, 3'-high, vertical posts attached to the deck by means of iron pins, top rail segments fastened to the posts by mortise & tenon joints and carriage bolts, and inclined endposts nailed to the posts.